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CLT market study

 CLT

Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is an engineered wood product that is rapidly gaining popularity in Europe and North America as a sustainable alternative to concrete and steel construction in commercial and multi-residential applications. Source: Timberbiz

The use of CLT panels has become a successful and popular method of construction in Europe since it was first introduced during the early 1990s.

It is currently used for all kinds of structures ranging from houses, barns, powerline towers, churches and bridges to high-rise apartment and office buildings, adding visibility and reputation to the system.

During 2008-2015, the global production of cross-laminated timber grew at a CAGR of around 26% with Europe accounting for most of this market.

Austria is currently the world’s biggest producer of CLT.

Other major producers include Germany, Czech Republic, Italy, Spain and Switzerland.

IMARC’s latest study “Cross-Laminated Timber Market – Industry Trends, Manufacturing Process, Plant Setup, Machinery, Raw Materials, Cost and Revenue” provides a techno-commercial roadmap for setting up a cross-laminated timber manufacturing plant.

The study covers all the requisite aspects of the cross-laminated timber market. This ranges from macro overview of the market to micro details of the industry performance, processing and manufacturing requirements, project cost, project funding, project economics, expected returns on investment, profit margins, etc.

This report is important for entrepreneurs, investors, researchers, consultants, business strategists, and all those who are planning to foray into the cross-laminated timber market in any manner.

Timberwize 4th August 2015

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Cross laminated timber (CLT): Australia’s rising star

Cross laminated timber (CLT) is the ‘it’ material of recent years, the rising star of the global mass timber construction industry. Often described as ‘pre-cast timber panels’, CLT is created by stacking kiln-dried timber boards with their lengths laid at 90 degree angles to each other, and gluing their surfaces together with non-toxic adhesives. Read more